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Thursday Morning Stream of Consciousness

Thursday, April 28, 2011, 11:35 EST Leave a comment Go to comments

Just got this inspirational nugget from my co-worker Rae-Anne:

If you can start the day without caffeine,
If you can always be cheerful, ignoring aches and pains,
If you can resist complaining and boring people with your troubles,
If you can eat the same food every day and be grateful for it,
If you can understand when your loved ones are too busy to give you any time,
If you can take criticism and blame without resentment,
If you can conquer tension without medical help,
If you can relax without alcohol,
If you can sleep without the aid of drugs…

…Then you are probably the family dog.


After several consecutive blissful nights of uninterrupted sleep, I was struck with insomnia again last night. While the previous streak of late-night tossing and turning was going on, I had concluded that it was [TMI ALERT! TMI ALERT! TMI ALERT!] hormone related. Now I’m not so sure. But I am sure that it sucks.


How about that Nathan Horton? If they gave out MVP awards for the first round of the Stanley Cup playoffs, I’m pretty sure that two game-winning goals in overtime would put you strongly in contention. The only way this Bruins victory could have been better is if it had happened in Montréal so we could see Habs fans leaving the arena looking like they were leaving a funeral.

Next up: Philly and a chance to ease the pain of last year’s abomination (which I refer to as the time when the Bruins “went Yankee“). I can’t say I’m optimistic, but anything is possible. So bring it on.


My oil company made a delivery this morning. Since I’m not on a fixed price contract, I pay market rate at the time of each delivery. At 8:30 this morning, that rate was $4.15 per gallon. The day before yesterday, I paid $3.899 for regular unleaded gasoline. Thanks, Barack.


Speaking of money and the geniuses who run our federal government, remember last year when I wrote about my skepticism of Ben Bernanke’s so-called quantitative easing policy? It turns out my skepticism was prophetic. And all I did was take two economics courses back in college. I must just possess extraordinary common sense.

Coincidentally, I just started reading a fun, albeit slightly outdated (2006), book by humor writer Dave Barry called Dave Barry’s Money Secrets, and damned if I don’t read the following in chapter one:

We don’t have the gold standard anymore. Nobody does. Over the years, all the governments in the world, having discovered that gold is, like, rare, decided that it would be more convenient to back their money with something that is easier to come by, namely: nothing. So even though the U.S. government still allegedly holds tons of gold in “reserve,” you can no longer exchange your dollars for it. You can’t even see it, because visitors are not allowed. For all you know, Fort Knox is filled with Cheez Whiz.

Which brings us back to the original question: If our money really is just pieces of paper, backed by nothing, why is it valuable? The answer is: Because we all believe it’s valuable.

Really, that’s pretty much it. Remember the part in Peter Pan where we clap to prove that we believe in fairies, and we save Tinker Bell? That’s our monetary system! It’s the Tinker Bell System!

And there you have it. Quantitative Easing: The Sequel didn’t work because we no longer believe our money is valuable, and apparently neither does the rest of the world.

We are so screwed.

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